Lessons Learned While Launching the First Issue of SERIAL Magazine

Over three months ago, I came up with the crazy idea to launch an old school pulp fiction magazine. To be honest, my first magazine dream came to me in high school. I had a name picked out and with the exception of publishing both fiction and non-fiction, the concept wasn’t too far off from what SERIAL Magazine is today.

While I’ve published fiction and non-fiction in multiple different formats, I’ve never published a magazine. As a result, I had a LOT to learn. These are top 3 things I’ve learned from inception to publishing the first issue of SERIAL Magazine.

1) The Writing Community is the Best Community

Publishing a magazine is a collaborative effort. I’ve worked with 13 writers, artists, editors, and advertisers on this first issue and I’ve responded to hundreds of emails from people who have submitted to our new publication. Again and again, I’m pleasantly surprised by the talent and kindness I get to experience by being a member of this community.

2) You Can’t Rush The Process

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Knowing that I was new to this, I added a lot of buffer time into my timeline and boy did I need every ounce of it..and then some. As the folks who pre-ordered Issue One have been informed, we’re still waiting on our print issues. A two day production time has turned into a week and a half and seeking a back up printer led to us receiving issues on time that are beautiful on the outside but have very poorly done insides. We fully expect our initial printer to complete a professional print run. However, this set back has been so damn disappointing. We’re pushing through and expect future issues to run much more smoothly.

3) There is Room for Every Dream

I feel this way every time I receive royalty deposits from previous publishing projects and I felt the same as I saw the first few orders for SERIAL Magazine roll in. Whatever crazy idea you have…there’s a market for it. Now, I don’t know how much our orders will grow by as we continue to promote our little pub, but I’m hopeful. Either way, no matter the size of our audience, we will continue to bring them the entertaining stories we love so much.

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